If I Were Tom | Prostate Cancer Support and Resources
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Living with Prostate Cancer

Good nutrition, along with regular physical activity and stress management can help you feel better and stay energized. Making a few simple changes, like increasing the variety of healthy foods you eat, limiting the amount of alcohol you drink, and maintaining a healthy weight can have long-lasting benefits to your health. As well, having a strong network of family and friends can help you maintain a positive attitude.

  • Mental Health

    A diagnosis of prostate cancer can significantly affect your mental health and impact your everyday life.

    Watch the following videos to hear Dr. David Kuhl, Physician, Dr. Marvin Westwood, Registered Psychologist, and Paul and Alan, prostate cancer survivors, provide ways to improve mental health and well-being. Then watch Dr. Simon Rice, Clinical Psychologist, discuss ways of recognizing potential signs of depression.

  • Physical Activity

    Physical activity can improve your general health, and help reduce some of the side effects of prostate cancer.

    Watch the following videos to hear Dr. Prue Cormie, an exercise physiologist, talk about the importance of incorporating physical activity in your daily life.

  • Food and Diet

    An overall healthy diet will improve your prostate cancer treatment outcomes, benefit your general health, and reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes and other cancers.

    Watch the following videos to hear Desiree Nielsen, a registered dietitian, share her expertise and tips on diet and nutrition for men with prostate cancer.

  • Erectile Dysfunction

    Prostate cancer and the treatment of prostate cancer can significantly impact sexual function.

    Watch the following videos as Lou Rioux, an erectile dysfunction counselor, describes a vacuum erection device and how it can assist men with erectile dysfunction.

  • Clinical Trials

    A clinical trial is a research study that includes volunteers to test new ways to prevent, detect, treat and/or manage prostate cancer.

    Watch the following video as oncologist, Dr. Bernie Eigl, shares his thoughts on how participating in clinical trials can benefit men with prostate cancer.

  • Complementary Alternative Medicine

    Complementary therapies may help, and include a variety of approaches such as acupuncture, massage, hypnotherapy, yoga and others.

    Watch the following video to hear Tracy Truant, an oncology nurse, explain complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and discuss useful tips for men who are considering CAM, and Claude's perspective on health promotion.

  • Support Groups

    The everyday challenges of prostate cancer can be good to talk about with other folks who are going through similar experiences.

    Watch the following videos to hear Dr. Marvin Westwood, psychologist, talk about the importance of securing support for men with prostate cancer and the benefits of men working in groups, and Bryan, a prostate cancer survivor, as he discusses his personal experiences with support groups.

  • Partners and Families

    Prostate cancer can impact your relationships, especially with your partner. But it can also bring couples and families closer together.

    Watch the following videos from a variety of perspectives from and about men and their partners.

  • Living Well

    Living well with prostate cancer means getting serious about managing your health. This involves adjusting to changes in yourself and your relationships with others, taking care of your mental, physical and spiritual well-being, maintaining a sense of purpose and preparing for your future. Leading an active lifestyle and eating healthy can lower the chances of your cancer coming back, and improve your chances of staying disease-free.

    Watch the following videos for suggestions on living a healthy lifestyle with prostate cancer from Dr. Marvin Westwood, psychologist, and Paul, prostate cancer survivor.

To see videos on all of these topics, visit ifiweretom.ubc.ca/living-with-prostate-cancer